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    Учебное пособие к элективному курсу «Зарубежная литература. Художественная литература Великобритании XIX-XX веков». Сборник упражнений для работы с книгой Р.Л.Стивенсона «Остров сокровищ»
    методическая разработка по английскому языку по теме

    Данное учебное пособие  представляет собой сборник коммуникативно-ориентированных заданий, направленных на развитие устной и письменной речи, логического и аргументированного высказывания, расширение словарного запаса учеников на основе чтения адаптированного романа  Р.Л.Стивенсона  “Остров сокровищ” Treasure Island. Серия «Английский клуб»/Intermediate.  Айрис-Пресс, 2007).  

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    __________________________________________________________________

    Учебное пособие к элективному курсу

    «Зарубежная литература. Художественная литература Великобритании XIX-XX веков»

    Сборник упражнений для работы с книгой Р.Л.Стивенсона «Остров сокровищ»

    Автор: учитель английского языка НОУ «Ногинская гимназия»

    Новицкая Ирина Владимировна

    _____________________________________________________________________________

    МЕТОДИЧЕСКАЯ ЗАПИСКА

    Предлагаемое учебное пособие предназначено для практических занятий по курсу «Художественная литература Великобритании XIX-XX веков» в 9 - 11 классах.

    Данное учебное пособие  представляет собой сборник коммуникативно-ориентированных заданий, направленных на развитие устной и письменной речи, логического и аргументированного высказывания, расширение словарного запаса учеников на основе чтения адаптированного романа  Р.Л.Стивенсона  “Остров сокровищ” Treasure Island. Серия «Английский клуб»/Intermediate.  Айрис-Пресс, 2007).  

    Пособие также ставит своей целью овладение учениками навыками самостоятельной работы такими как: нахождение в тексте необходимой информации, использование различных форм изложения мысли по прочитанному материалу (анализ, обобщение и др.).

    Пособие рассчитано на девять языковых занятий. восемь занятий отводятся проработке отдельных частей книги, а девятое (заключительное) занятие предполагает обсуждение произведения в целом: проблематики, главных персонажей, языка и стиля писателя, впечатления от прочитанного и т.д.

    Каждый из восьми разделов пособия имеет следующую структуру:

    1. Активный словарь к соответствующей части произведения (Active vocabulary).  Предполагается,  что уже в процессе прочтения очередного отрывка произведения ученик обращает внимание на выделенный лексический материал, а затем активно использует его при обсуждении содержания данного отрывка.

    1. Задания (темы и вопросы) для передачи содержания (Who or what in the chapters?  Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text. Say who made the utterances and under what circumstances). Данные задания обеспечивают концентрацию внимания учеников на наиболее важных и значимых моментах произведения. Эти задания призваны помочь ученикам при домашней подготовке к уроку по конкретному отрывку произведения.

    1. Задания для анализа (Questions and topics for analysis). Эти задания ставят своей задачей развитие навыка неподготовленной речи, давая возможность ученику высказать свое мнение, принять участие в дискуссии.

    1. Креативное письмо (Writing).

    Девятый  раздел представляет список вопросов для заключительного обсуждения произведения.

    Автор

            ASSIGNMENT 1

    (Chapters 1-3)

    Active vocabulary:

    to keep nothing back        to have the courage to do sth        to obey sb straightaway

    cove        to glare at         to fetch sth

    shanty         to pin        upon my honor

    to avoid sth or sb        to puzzle sb        to grip like a vice

    Who or what in the chapter:

    1. Was only a boy at the time when his father kept the Admiral Benbow Inn?
    2. Came to the inn door with his sea chest following behind?
    3. Walked round the cove or upon the cliffs, with a telescope?
    4. Was frightened by the thought of the seaman with one leg?
    5. Admired Captain and called him “a true sea dog”?
    6. Was a bright man with pleasant manners, a wig as white as snow, and bright black eyes?
    7. Was pale with two fingers missing on his left hand?
    8. Had a scar on one cheek?
    9. Disappeared from sight in seconds in spite of his wound?
    10. Was Old Flint’s best friend and was the only one who knew the place?
    11. Was blind and tapped before him with a stick?

    Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text:

    1. Every day when the captain came back from his walk, he used to ask if any seamen had gone along the road.
    2. It was his stories that frightened people most of all.
    3. My father always said that the inn would be ruined but I really do believe that his presence did us good.
    4. Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon put his knife away and took his seat as a beaten dog.
    5. His brown face became white, and even his nose turned blue.
    6. Here’s luck. A fair wind. Billy Bones his fancy.
    7. That made everything else seem quite unimportant.
    8. I ran to him at once, calling my mother. But it was too late.

    Say who made these utterances and under what circumstances. Discuss the motives of the speaker and the moral implication of each utterance:

    1. I’ll stay here a bit. I’m a plain man, rum and bacon and eggs is what I want.
    2. If you keep on drinking rum, the world will soon be free of a very dirty fellow!
    3. Ah! My friend Bill will be glad to see me.
    4. I must get away from here! Rum! Rum!
    5. I’ll do my best to save his worthless life.
    6. Bear in mind that the word ‘rum’ is death to you.
    7. Take me straight, or I’ll break your arm!
    8. Ten o’clock! Six hours!

    Questions and topics for analysis:

    1. Jim begins the story by recounting his first meeting with a ragged but imposing old seaman that shows up at the Admiral Benbow. What does the unusual device of a young man narrator give the narrative?
    2. Black dog appears. Comment on the purpose of his visit. Say what causes Billy’s heart attack?
    3. Billy tells Jim about the secret plan of the crew he used to sail with on one ship under Captain Flint. The Captain is given the black spot. The effect produced.

    Writing (choose one topic):

    1. Comment on the opposition between the upstanding world of justice and the sinister world of crime in the first chapters. Which world is more powerful?
    2. Do you agree that the scene in which Dr Livesey coolly rebuffs Billy’s knifepoint threats is an early exploration of one of Stevenson’s central ideas in the novel – the frequent opposition between social lawfulness and personal charisma?

    ASSIGNMENT 2

    (Chapters 4-6)

    Active vocabulary:

    thimble        a great to-do                                        can’t make head or tail of

    suspicious        to roar                                          be  as silent as the grave

    Who or what in the chapter:

    1. Realized at once what a difficult and dangerous position they were in?
    2. Helped his mother off the road and down the bridge, where she fell on his shoulder?
    3. Tried to break down the door of the inn?
    4. Turned with a scream and ran straight under the nearest of the coming horses?
    5. Could make nothing of the scene?
    6. Had to report Pew’s death to Dr Livesey or to Squire Trelawney?
    7. Was a tall man with a red face?
    8. Told his story like a lesson?
    9. Was the blood-thirstiest pirate that ever sailed?

    Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text:

    1. No sooner said than done.
    2. ‘You have till ten tonight’ was written on the other side of it.
    3. Suddenly I heard a sound that brought my heart into my mouth.
    4. I was sure that the locked door must have seemed suspicious and would bring the whole hornets’ nest about our ears.
    5. A little cold water brought her round again.
    6. We opened the packet and found two things...

    Say who made these utterances and under what circumstances. Discuss the motives of the speaker and the moral implication of each utterance:

    1. And small thanks to you, you’re chicken-hearted men!
    2. And I’ll take the captains papers!
    3. My dear, take the money and run on. I’m going to faint.
    4. I wish I had put his eyes out!
    5. You would be as rich as kings if you could find the papers!
    6. To tell the truth, I would really like to put it in a safe place.
    7. What good wind brought you here?
    8. What else would they risk their dirty lives for if not for money?
    9. This is the black-hearted pirate’s account book.
    10. We’ll have favorable winds!
    11. Who is that? Name the dog, Sir!

    Questions and topics for analysis:

    1. Jim and his mother flee to the neighboring village to seek for help. Explain why none of the villagers agree to go to the inn to offer assistance? Prove that in these chapters Jim is already beginning to develop as a character or as a hero.
    2. Explain why the eight men seem quite disappointed to find that the chest contains only money? What are they interested in? Where is the missing object? Comment on the circumstances of Pew’s death.
    3. Comment on the way Livesey and Trelawney, the respectable members of local society, become boyishly excited upon seeing Flint’s map. How can you explain their desire to become pirate adventures themselves? What is the image left by the pirates in their minds?

    Writing (choose one topic you like!):

    1. Jim’s vision of Pew suggests that these pirates are supernatural, as Pew appears much more powerful that one would expect a blind man to be. Like many other pirates he is physically flawed – he lacks sight. What in your opinion compensates for the pirates’ physical flaws and captivates Jim?
    2. Do you agree that the readiness of Dr Livesey and Squire Trelawney to become adventurous boys again is a part of a theme central to this novel: Stevenson implies that there is a little pirate in everyone, old or young, nobleman or beggar?

    ASSIGNMENT 3

    (Chapters 7-9)

    Active vocabulary:

    dock        from first to last        by the powers

    harbour        every now and then

    Who or what in the chapter:

    1. Was hard at work at Bristol?
    2. Approached the island from every possible direction, explored every acre of its surface?
    3. Helped Trelawney to gather a company of real sea dogs?
    4. Sent two men away out of the six Trelawney had taken on?
    5. Hopped over upon his crutch like a bird?
    6. Made himself the most interesting companion?
    7. Was a sharp-looking man who seemed angry with everything on board?
    8. Thought he had the right to choose the crew himself?

    Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text:

    1. I though I knew what a pirate was like – very different from this clean and smiling man.

    Say who made these utterances and under what circumstances. Discuss the motives of the speaker and the moral implication of each utterance:

    1. So did everyone here in Bristol as soon as they heard where we wanted to go – for treasure, I mean.
    2. I was going to sea myself, to sea in a ship, with real seamen, to look for treasure!
    3. Bravo! The ship’s company is complete!
    4. Oh, stop him! It’s Black Dog!
    5. I don’t like these pirates.
    6. I don’t think that you always find the best men, but I will say this, John silver is a fine man.
    7. Now I find out that every man on board knows more than I do.
    8. I don’t like treasure hunts above all when they are secret and when the secret has been told to the parrot!
    9. I didn’t tell anyone!
    10. As far as that man is concerned I think he is neither gentleman nor a good sailor.
    11. I’ll have no favourites on my ship.

    Questions and topics for analysis:

    1. Speak about the letter from Squire Trelawney describing the ship and the crew he has obtained. Who helped the squire procure the ship? Who helped him arrange the crew? Why is Jim certain that Dr Livesey wouldn’t like the letter?
    2. Jim is leaving for Bristol. Comment on the way Jim bade farewell to his mother.
    3. Give a character sketch of Long John Silver. Do you believe that Long John and the one-legged pirate the Captain was afraid of are two different persons? Why?
    4. Give a character sketch of Captain Smollett. What didn’t he like about the voyage and why? Speak about the ways of improving the situation suggested by the captain. What was sailors’ (the crew, Squire Trelawney, Dr Livesey, Jim) attitude towards the captain? Were they right?

    Writing:

    What in Silver’s character makes people trust him?

    ASSIGNMENT 4

    (Chapters 10-12)

    Active vocabulary:

    to have no command among        full of admiration        raisin

    to be dog-tired        can’t stand

    to smell gunpowder        that’s my view

    Who or what in the chapter:

    1. Was dog-tired but didn’t want to leave the deck?
    2. Knew his job well?
    3. Had no command among the crew?
    4. Was a cheerful, experienced old seaman who was able to help the squire with almost anything?
    5. Was called Barbecue?
    6. Had a way of talking to each of them and of doing everybody some service?
    7. Was called after a famous pirate?
    8. Has been to Madagascar, to Malabar, and Surinam?
    9. Realized the lives of all the honest men aboard the ship depended upon him alone?
    10. Managed to hide his feelings?
    11. Was anxious to tell them what he heard?

    Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text:

    1. The excitement of the moment carried me back to the Admiral Benbow in a second.
    2. Then one dark night during some heavy weather, he disappeared.
    3. All this made me think he was the best.
    4. Just as I was about to jump out the man began to speak.
    5. You can imagine my horror!
    6. I understood at once it was not the map he had hoped to see.

    Say who made these utterances and under what circumstances. Discuss the motives of the speaker and the moral implication of each utterance:

    1. Pieces of eight!
    2. It spoils the men. That’s my belief.
    3. Getting money isn’t difficult. The art is in saving.
    4. Well, most of them are here.
    5. I knew it would be all right with Dick. He is no fool.
    6. At the last possible moment and that’s when.
    7. Not another man will help us.
    8. I’m a fool and I wait for your orders.
    9. He would look even more remarkable with a rope around his neck, Sir!
    10. But we can’t do anything till we know whom we can trust.

    Questions and topics for analysis:

    1. Comment on the way the roles of the characters become more ambiguous as the journey to Treasure Island unfolds (here speak of Mr Arrow, Long John, the crew, Jim).
    2. Jim learns that most of old Flint’s former crewmembers are on board the ship, planning to take the treasure for themselves.
    3. The development of Silvers’ character in these chapters. Prove that Silver is a very complex man.  Speak of his motivation for seeking the treasure.

    Writing:

    1. Agree or disagree and give your reasons: The changing of roles on the ship challenge established ideas about social hierarchy and authority, and give priority to a nontraditional set of values. The old order and power structure gives way to a new one that is based on strength and charisma.

    ASSIGNMENT 5

    (Chapters 13- 15)

    Active vocabulary:

    to hiss        to pinch        shallow water

    shipwreck        stockade

    to maroon sb        Jolly Roger

    Who or what in the chapter:

    1. Covered a large part of the island?
    2. Hated the very thought of Treasure Island and was terribly afraid of the future?
    3. Stood sniffing and sniffing like someone smelling a bad egg?
    4. Lay about the deck and didn’t want to obey?
    5. Was uninhabited?
    6. Killed Tom quickly with his knife?
    7. Climbed down the stockade and was warmly welcomed by his friends?
    8. Sat down to write the record of events?

    Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text:

    1. It was the idea that helped to save our lives.
    2. A cruel punishment among the pirates.
    3. The squire was sitting down, as white as a sheet.

    Say who made these utterances and under what circumstances. Discuss the motives of the speaker and the moral implication of each utterance:

    1. My men, it’s hot, and we are all tired. The boats are still in the water. Take them and go ashore for the afternoon.
    2. You’ve killed Alan, have you? Kill me too. If you can.
    3. I’m poor Ben Gunn, and I haven’t spoken to a man for three years.
    4. You don’t happen to have a small piece of cheese on you, do you?
    5. I’ve found Flint’s treasure.
    6. We didn’t know how he could have killed all of them – one against six.
    7. They started to fight!
    8. We never doubted your honesty, Jim.
    9. I give you thirty seconds to join me.
    10. Yes, Tom, my man. You are going home.
    11. They can’t see the house from the ship, but the flag makes us an easy target. Shall we take it down?

    Questions and topics for analysis:

    1. Prove that the allure of the island begins to fade when the ship lands. Why do you think we no longer see the island as a fantasy place and start to feel its dismal reality?
    2. Speak about the way Jim’s sense of independence and free will continue to develop. Prove that Jim is learning to make good use not only of his successes, but also of his errors.
    3. Speak about the way Jim’s concept of death begins to change in these chapters. Do you agree that death is all around Jim on the island – both literal and symbolic?
    4. What are Stevenson’s reasons for switching narrators from Jim to Dr Livesey? What is the effect achieved?

    Writing:

    1. Do you agree that the change in narrative voice subtly reminds the reader that Jim’s story is not simply a recounting of a series of events involving pirates and treasure, but also a tale of his own personal and moral development? Give your reasons.
    2. In these chapters Stevenson continues to explore the conflict between social organization and anarchy. Do you agree that Ben Gunn is an example of what happens to a man when he is removed from the protection of social structure?

    ASSIGNMENT 6

    (Chapters 16-18)

    Active vocabulary:

    to crawl        to prop against        to take a good/huge gulp

    in a voice of thunder        a low moan        to leap

            at the ready

    Who or what in the chapter:        

    1. Had twenty guns between the seven of them?
    1. Made their way to the stockade, shouting as they ran?
    2. Lay wounded with his pistol still smoking in his hand?
    3. Was shot through the head, never to move again?
    4. Died quietly in the evening, without having uttered a sound?
    5. Found it difficult to stay inside the house when there was so much blood about and so many poor dead bodies all around?
    6. Was made of wood and goat skin?
    7. Were fighting to the death?
    8. When was safe, loaded his pistols with dry powder?

    Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text:

    1. In this way our live in the stockade began.
    2. Silver’s words meant nothing to him but I understood what the cook was speaking about.
    3. But the captain made no change to his orders.
    4. Now we saw the price that we had paid for victory.
    5. Each new wave carried the threat of death.
    6. We’ve made a bargain.
    7. This was what I wanted to know: he could move about and he was armed.
    8. They didn’t fall alone, with a cry, Hands fell into the water.

    Say who made these utterances and under what circumstances. Discuss the motives of the speaker and the moral implication of each utterance:

    1. It’s Silver with a white flag!
    2. Captain Silver! I don’t know him. Who’s he?
    3. And those who die will be the lucky ones.
    4. It’s good to tell the truth!
    5. That’s better. That leaves us five against eight.
    6. Why, is Dr Livesey mad?
    7. I’ve come aboard to control the ship, Mr. Hands. I’ll be your captain.
    8. Easy, when the tide’s in, all the men will pull her off the sand.

    Questions and topics for analysis:

    1. Comment on the way Stevenson contrasts the personalities of the two opposing leaders, Captain Smollet and John Silver. What gives additional depth to the character of Silver? Which way does Stevenson imply that while the pirates may be socially irresponsible, their inner charisma far outshines that of good men such as Smollet and Livesey?
    2. Prove that in these chapters Jim continues to demonstrate his tendency to follow mad whims and private impulses. Does he simply dream of a heroic act? What does Stevenson emphasize in focusing so inclusively on Jim in chapters 17 and 18?
    3. Comment on the way the reckless abut fascinating character of the pirates also develops further in these chapters. Prove that Stevenson portrays them as utterly unable to take care of their own lives in any responsible way.
    4. Do you agree that the quick ascent to power (Jim promotes himself from cabin boy to captain) is as central to Jim’s adventure as the search for treasure? What is more important? What does symbolize Jim and Hands’ struggle on deck?

    Writing

    1. Do you agree that pirates’ impulsiveness and lack of forethought does lend them a somewhat animal character? (Do they have the concept of themselves as a community? Do they bid farewell to the dead? Are they capable of teamwork at all times? Why do they clearly favor anarchy?) Give your reasons.

    ASSIGNMENT 7

    (Chapters 19-21)

    Active vocabulary:

    utter despair         in full agreement        worm

    to puff          mess

    Who or what in the chapter:

    1. Seemed to move a little, as if he were trying to rise?
    2. Seemed to burn like a hot iron?
    3. Lay in deep shadow?
    4. Came down with a white flag?
    5. Had a right to hold a council?
    6. Was always quick when it came to business?
    7. Felt ashamed to look Dr Livesey in the face?

    Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text:

    1. I heard noise that was not pleasant as such.
    2. I could only think that all my friends had been killed.
    3. No man ever stood against me and lived to tell the tale, Tom Morgan!
    4. No longer captain.
    5. He spoke to them as if he were speaking to his villagers on his quiet country round.
    6. I think I have found a way that will suit everyone. Jim, will you promise not to escape?
    7. Tears came into my eyes.

    Say who made these utterances and under what circumstances. Discuss the motives of the speaker and the moral implication of each utterance:

    1. Here’s Jim Hawkins, how friendly of you to visit us.
    2. So you’ll have to join Captain Silver, Jim.
    3. And it was this same boy who took the map from Billy Bones’ sea-chest.
    4. If you kill the boy, you’ll have to fight me.
    5. They are going to overrule me.
    6. I know that you’ve got the ship safe. I’m on the squire’s side now.
    7. It’s very unlucky to cut paper from a Bible. Which fool did that?
    8. I’ll tell you what’s wrong.
    9. But look here - that’s why I let them go.
    10. It’s the early bird that, as the saying goes, that catches the worm.
    11. Well, well, duty first.
    12. Jim, I can’t have this. Jump over and we’ll run.

    Questions and topics for analysis:

    1. Do you agree that in the episode when Jim is looking at the corpse of the dead Irishman Jim seems to straddle the line between the civilized men and the pirates? Prove that Jim’s behaviour in the 17th chapter is unexpectedly pirate like.

    1. Prove that pirates’ inability to take care of themselves becomes even more obvious in these chapters. What does the tension within the pirates’ band foreshadow?

    1. Do you agree that Jim’s refusal to run away with Dr Livesey is highly ironic? Why? Is his refusal a practical or an ethical one? What does this prove?

    Writing:

    Speak about the spiritual aspect of the novel that appears in a small plot detail that acquires considerable symbolic importance: the black spot is written on a page torn from the Bible.

    ASSIGNMENT 8

    (Chapters 22-24)

    Active vocabulary:

    armed to the teeth        struck dumb        to wriggle

    to rattle        one-legged cripple         on one’s conscience

    Who or what in the chapter:

    1. Would prefer wealth and freedom with the pirates?
    2. Was led like a dancing bear?
    3. Risked falling down the hill?
    4. Still remained rooted to the ground?
    5. Took out Bible and began to pray hard?
    6. Became calm almost immediately?
    7. Finished his work only two months before the Hispaniola arrived?
    8. Decided that it would be better for them to move to the cave?
    9. Were in great contrast to the dark and bloody air of the island?

    Interpret the meaning of the following lines from the text:

    1. He seems to be working for both sides.
    2. I couldn’t find an explanation for anything.
    3. It wasn’t the treasure that he had found.
    4. The colour went from their faces as if by magic.
    5. So near to the gold all his promises to the doctor were forgotten.
    6. And how many it had cost before.
    7. Never I’m sure had anyone been happier.
    8. The ship’s cook hadn’t gone empty-handed.

    Say who made these utterances and under what circumstances. Discuss the motives of the speaker and the moral implication of each utterance:

    1. We must keep close to each other and we’ll save our necks no matter what.
    2. Well, it is a pointer.
    3. This is one of his jokes and no mistake.
    4. Those were Flint’s last words!
    5. By the powers! Ben Gunn!
    6. Take that and be ready for trouble.
    7. Ah, Merry, so you want to be captain again, do you?
    8. We must cut them off from the boats!
    9. Here is our ghost!
    10. I certainly would have!
    11. You like to work on your own too much.

    Questions and topics for analysis:

    1. Comment on the way spirituality and the treasure come together in these last chapters. What does approaching the treasure mean?
    2. Comment on the way Stevenson questions the value of money in these last chapters. Don’t you think that in the episode when Jim and his friends carry the treasure down to the Hispaniola it appears a heavy burden to bear? What does it symbolize?
    3. What in the last passage of the novel proves that Dr Livesey and Trelawney do not inspire Jim in the way that Silver has? What makes us think that Jim won’t grow up to become like either Livesey or Trelawney?

    Writing:

    The closing paragraph of the novel summarizes Jim’s feelings about his adventure. What does he finally realize?

    ASSIGNMENT 9

    General discussion of the novel

    1. The main themes in the novel.

    1. Do you agree that Treasure Island is a simple adventure tale rather than a coming-of-age story? Why?

    1. Why do you think Stevenson chooses a boy to narrate this tale?

    1. Discuss the role of Ben Gunn in the novel. Why does Stevenson include this character, and why does he describe Ben as he does?

    1. Why does Stevenson make such an effort to show Long John Silver’s positive traits?

    1. Compare Captain Smollett’s leadership abilities to those of Long John Silver. The two men lead their crews in very different ways. What do their individual styles reveal about the two characters?

    1. Jim never refers to the island as anything other than Treasure Island, but Treasure Island is only the voyagers’ private nickname for the place. Why doesn’t Jim or Stevenson reveal a more geographically accurate name for this island? Does this name change our perception of the place?

    1. The only examples of religious activity in this novel occur toward the end. Why do you think Stevenson shows his characters’ religious side only near the end of their adventure?

    1. Though there is nothing political or colonial about Squire Trelawney’s expedition, flags appear frequently in this novel. Since Treasure Island is not being claimed as a British territory, the function of the flags seems more symbolic than political. Why are flags so important in Treasure Island?

    1. On Treasure Island, Jim earns the respect of his colleagues and successfully discovers the fortune he sought. In light of these successes, why does Jim nonetheless have an aversion (dislike) to Treasure Island?

            


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